Are Job Boards Dead? Top Reasons that Job Boards are not as Effective

Once upon a time in the infancy of the internet—or — as short a time ago as just 4 or 5 years, job boards were “the” place to go for you to post your resume. Boards were also the best place to post a job where good people were hanging around reviewing them and waiting for the right job to come along. Today people are looking in other places and in many cases, finding jobs without going to the job boards at all. IoT jobs in particular simply don’t do well on the job board scenario.

Today there are dozens of places where you can find just the right person and you won’t have to work quite as hard. Job boards are still out there and to an extent they are still effective, but they are not AS effective because better things have replaced them.

According to JobVites Job Seeker Survey, social media is streaks ahead of the job board these days.

Why has the effectiveness of the job board gone down so much?

First of all many job postings never quite make it to the job board. That means that many of the jobs that actually are available are never seen. Not to mention that many jobs posted on job boards are also posted in a dozen other places and may have been filled and not deleted from the job boards. In addition, consider the many advances in technology and how we are using them.

Networking sites allow for nearly live interaction between the job seeker and the company seeking new employees. Resumes may be placed in the cloud and skill sets verified so that companies may seek out the workers of their choice and verify some of their work history.

Networking and social media sites have about a 45%-50 % effectiveness rating today when it comes to finding jobs. Job boards, which used to boast a 30-40% rating, are now seeing about 10 percent effectiveness in the jobs attainment.

These same networking sites also give us the means to explore the companies for which the recruits or candidates will work. Networking and recruiting is changing the way that we attain jobs or new talent because:

·      Your resume doesn’t fall into the job board black hole.

·      You’re not wasting your time because you do see/address the decision makers for the company or the recruiters seeking out new candidates.

·      By the time that the jobs make it to the jobs board, hundreds of people may have already applied but the same is not true for jobs you see on the social media sites.

Social media sites such as Facebook and LinkedIn are by and large replacing the job board sites and give us the means to interact in a live way, to verify information and to recruit people who seem to be a good fit for our open positions.

Job boards may be on the downhill slide but job sites or networking sites are providing some of the best ways for candidates to search out new jobs as well as for companies or recruiting agents to find new talent to fill those jobs.

About Bill McCabe/ Internet of Things Recruiting – Executive Search/ Retained Search for the Internet of Things/ Machine 2 Machine/ Big Data Markets

Onalytica IOT Top Influencer # 6 Per Onalytica 6/17

Top Industrial IOT Influencer Worldwide Per Right Relevance – March 2017

IBM IOT Futurist – Top 50 IOT Authority on Twitter – Guest contributor to IoT Central, Medium and US.ibm.com/blog

Need Help finding your next Big Data or IOT Employee or If you require the top 5% of IOT talent let’s talk. Drop me a line or use this link to schedule an IOT Search Assessment Call Click Here to Schedule

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Planning Your Career in 2017

You will never hear anyone say, “I hope my career stagnates this year.” Your IoT career is a chosen path and you want to be sure that you move forward in it.

The problem is that many of us are not entirely sure what to do to plan our career. We planned our education and we planned our employment, but for many of us, that’s as far as we got.

Why should you plan your career?

Think of your IoT career as sort of a lifelong road trip. Without a map you’re going to end up going somewhere, but realistically you’re probably not going to go anywhere worth being. Without good directions, a map or a gps, the trip isn’t going to end on a high note.

Having a career plan gives you a general goal and a set of directions that can help you to get there. The plan will make you take a closer look at the things you are doing and what they are doing for your career. It makes you think hard and commit to a given process. That process begins with assessing the past year and taking a hard look at where you’ve been.

Ask yourself the question “Where would I like to be in my IoTcareer by the end of next year?” “What kind of IoT jobs are out there and what should I be considering?” What would make you feel as though you were a success? How will you know if you’ve achieved your goal? By setting a benchmark or a point that serves as a goalpost.

Next, set your definition of how you are going to get there. IoT jobs are a unique type of employment and each job in IoT requires a unique set of skills and a unique methodology for moving forward in your career path. There are no cookie cutter solutions for making your IoT career move forward.

Plot a course. Define the steps that you need to take and the way in which you will accomplish the forward momentum for your career. Give yourself quarterly goals and objectives to meet that will help you to get where you want to be.

Get help in defining your career path. If you’re uncertain as to how to chart a path forward in your career, find someone who is doing well and has steadily moved forward and ask for their assistance.

Speak with anyone who has successfully navigated a career path like yours. Even older people who are getting ready to retire and have been successful in their career are great people to work with.

Make a choice about the best way to navigate your career path and then commit to it. Watch where you go and evaluate the results at the end of the quarter. If the goals have been met and the movement is positive, continue on that path and it they have not, reevaluate and chart a new path to take you where you want to be.

Just as everything in life changes, your plan will change too and in some cases, things will not go 100 percent according to the plan. The important thing is that you have a goal post and some guidelines with which to work. Those can be changed as necessary to give you a guide that will allow you to plot a more successful career.

Top Three Skills for Data Security Pros

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Security in IoT is also a necessity

Top Three Skills for Data Security Pros

What you need to succeed in data security? Compliance, Governance and Data Security Experts

If 2016 shapes up anything like the last quarter of 2015, data security in the IOT will continue to be a hot topic for all of us working to protect our work in the Cloud. In my last article, I discussed several trends that we are monitoring at SoftNet Search’s IOT practice area. This time, I will weigh in on the kinds of people who will fulfill the needs of companies who are staying ahead of data security trends.

IT Headcount Going Up

According to all the people that matter, IT will continue to hire data security and other pros in 2016. For example, Computerworld’s recent survey showed that “37% of the 182 IT professionals who responded to the survey said they plan to increase head count in the upcoming year — that’s a significant jump from last year, when only 24% said they planned to add new staff. Moreover, 24% of those polled this year listed “attracting new talent” as first among their business priorities for the next 12 months.”

So how will they find the data security specialists they need? They will focus on these top three skills:

1) Security (General) – General security projects rated number two in the “most important IT projects that survey respondents have underway.” General security specialists, including data security pros, will command higher salaries, with Robert Half Technology 2016 Salary Guide predicting a 5% to 7% rise this year, hitting a range of 100K to 200K on average.

2) Compliance– Small-to-medium sized businesses are racing to ensure that their compliance policies are up to speed, especially if they’re working in the IOT. Healthcare continues to head up the compliance market in this field, with financial services and consumer privacy goals (customer information safety) coming in a close second and third, respectively. Data security specialists and database analysts will continue to command higher salaries—and a track record of managing big data in the cloud – and providing compliance leadership for functional business partners—is a must. Computerworld again: “Exactly 50% of the IT professionals who participated in our Forecast 2016 survey said they plan to increase spending on security technologies in the next 12 months.” Making sure these technologies include built-in compliance gate keeping will be top of mind for data security leaders all throughout 2016.

3) Governance– Many large corporations have a lock on their governance policies because they have the headcount to ensure that Cloud and SaaS solutions across the enterprise fold into their existing governance plans. They can also pull together IT governance committees to get ahead of this issue and ensure that data security guardrails are firmly in place via smart governance plans.

Who owns your data security governance policy?

The problem is, many companies have had to institute ad hoc governance because they don’t have the time to control these policies in a centralized way. Functional, siloed IT business partners might “own” the governance policies for say, customer information, with others guarding HR or manufacturing data. Data security pros with backgrounds in IT governance can help answer IT leaders’ most pressing governance questions in an enterprise-wide manner and ensure that governance rules don’t languish in silos, making your company prone to breaches of policy. Hire someone to answer these questions:

  • How to start instituting a cohesive governance strategy that grows with the company (and its technologies)?
  • Who should we include on our team
  • How long it will take until the governance policy works on its own to cover all of our technologies and foreseeable ones?
  • Who should manage the project and become accountable from the beginning?

 

If your data security pros don’t have the answers to these questions or have not worked as a team to define governance for the IOT, chances are they will need to get up to speed—and quickly.

 

What doesn’t work as well?

We’ve watched some companies hire a consultant to help the Corporate Governance Officers (CGOs) with the IT end of their jobs. The problem with that solution is that IOT and cloud-based data security and governance should not be placed on the table in front of a bunch of lawyers that, no matter how skilled, can’t be expected to keep up with best practices in the field. Hiring internal IT governance headcount, if even on a contract basis, works better in the long run and will cost you thousands less without costing you your peace of mind.

 

If you’d like to know more about the highly-skilled data security specialists I’ve seen in my practice; or if your enterprise requires help with IT compliance, governance or data security in general, definitely give me a shout.

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